15 Incorrect Predictions of the Future: How They Apply to You

15 Incorrect Predictions of the Future: How They Apply to You

Incorrect Predictions of the Future

You think too small.

Impossible

Waste of time

Worthless

Needless

Excess

Throughout history, the above words have described some of the most influential innovations known to man.

Doubt exists among the masses, a crutch that most carry around subconsciously. Doubts of others. Doubts of self. Doubts of change.

We fear the unknown, and get naturally get defensive and dismissive when our belief system is challenged.

This thought process is dangerous and will stunt growth. Stop thinking small and learn to challenge what you’re told. Rely on your own logic to solve problems.

It’s only those crazy enough to challenge the things as they are who accomplish massive feats.

Every major innovation started as someone’s dream. Below,  l list 15 quotes that question innovation.

1. “There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home.” 

Ken Olson, president, chairman and founder of Digital Equipment Corp., maker of big business mainframe computers, (1977.

2. “There is practically no chance communications space satellites will be used to provide better telephone, telegraph, television, or radio service inside the United States.” 

T. Craven, FCC Commissioner, 1961. Four years later, the first commercial communications satellite was orbiting Earth.

3. “A rocket will never be able to leave the Earth’s atmosphere.”

New York Times, 1936.

4. “Flight by machines heavier than air is unpractical and insignificant, if not utterly impossible.” 

Simon Newcomb, 1902. The Wright Brothers flew the first successful powered aircraft 18 months later in 1903.

5. “There will never be a bigger plane built.”

Engineer of multinational aerospace and defense corporation Boeing after he traveled on a plane that could hold only 10 passengers.

6. “This is the biggest fool thing we have ever done. The bomb will never go off, and I speak as an expert in explosives.”

Admiral William D. Leahy, Chief of Staff to the Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy during World War II, advising President Truman on the atomic bomb, 1945.

7. “There is not the slightest indication that nuclear energy will ever be obtainable. It would mean that the atom would have to be shattered at will.”

Albert Einstein, 1932.

8. “The horse is here to stay but the automobile is only a novelty – a fad.” 

The President of the Michigan Savings Bank advising Henry Ford’s lawyer, Horace Rackham, not to invest in the Ford Motor Co, 1903.

9. “This ‘telephone’ has too many shortcomings to be seriously considered as a means of communication. The device is inherently of no value to us.”

A memo at Western Union, 1878.

10. “The world potential market for copying machines is 5000 at most.”

IBM, to the eventual founders of Xerox, saying the photocopier market wasn’t large enough to justify mass production, 1959.

11. “The idea that cavalry will be replaced by these iron coaches is absurd. It is little short of treasonous.”

Comment of Aide-de-camp to Field Marshal Haig, at a tank demonstration, 1916.

12. “Television won’t last. It’s a flash in the pan.”

Mary Somerville, the first Director of School Broadcasting, 1948.

13. “The wireless music box has no imaginable commercial value. Who would pay for a message sent to no one in particular?”

Associates of David Sarnoff responding to the call for investment in the radio, 1921.

14.So we went to Atari and said, ‘Hey, we’ve got this amazing thing, even built with some of your parts, and what do you think about funding us? Or we’ll give it to you. We just want to do it. Pay our salary, we’ll come work for you.’ And they said, ‘No.’ So then we went to Hewlett-Packard, and they said, ‘Hey, we don’t need you. You haven’t got through college yet.'”

Apple Computer Inc. founder Steve Jobs on attempts to get Atari and HP interested in his and Steve Wozniak’s personal computer.

15. “We don’t like their sound, and guitar music is on the way out.”

Decca Recording Co. rejecting the Beatles, 1962.

Innovators face the brunt of criticism as they live to push the limits and uncover improved ways of life.

When we follow the crowd, we are ensuring we will never be different. There is no place for conformity in the world of innovation.

Have you been afraid to try something new because you feared being ridiculed? Break free of popular opinion. Once you do, your creative process will thrive.

Stay believing.

Screenshot 2015-11-21 at 12.56.17 PM

 

 

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About Axel Page

My name is Axel Page and I'm the originator of Shameless Pride. If you like what you see, be sure to check out my other content and sign up for my newsletter. Also, connect with me on social media below!